National Reconciliation Week – Story, song and Jessie Lloyd

Monday 29 May 2017 at 11am, Wallaroo Community House, 6 Wallaroo Place Hastings West

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As part of 2017 National Reconciliation Week, Indigenous musician Jessie Lloyd gathered with local people from the Mornington Peninsula area to share true-to-life stories and heartfelt songs. These stories and songs are from her Mission Songs Project. The Project has taken Jessie to different parts of Australia to meet Indigenous Australians who were affected by Christian missions, state-run camps and relocation. As part of the Project, Jessie collects songs that Indigenous Australians have written and sung depicting their mission experiences. Through sharing songs from the Mission Songs Project and encouraging others to do the same, Jessie aims to preserve and pass on this precious cultural practise and in doing so, shed light on the history of Indigenous families, elders and communities.

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Jessie’s warmth of spirit and openness with which she shared the knowledge and stories of her family delighted each of the 40-odd people who attended this unique and inspiring event. Jessie’s impact was immediate, as many people went away humming a tune before enjoying the delicious lunch provided. Adding to the atmosphere of warmth and sharing was the enthusiastic address and attendance by the Good Shepherd staff who organised the event, and the friendliness and hospitality of the volunteers at Wallaroo Community House who hosted the event.

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Jessie Lloyd’s visit was inspiring for our local community, bringing people together in the spirit of reconciliation. What is more, recognising the historical experiences of Indigenous people through music fosters the healing that will unite the people of Australia towards a better, fairer future.

For more information on 2017 National Reconciliation Week and events near you visit reconciliation.org.au/nrw

Visit the Balnarring Hall on Friday 2 June at 7:30pm for a free film event hosted by Willum Warrain Aboriginal Association. Prison Songs, a groundbreaking documentary that gives voice to Indigenous Australians behind bars – through song.

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Copyright © 2017 Jade Barker

 

Mr Stink live on stage

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Friday 17th March at 6pm, Frankston Arts Centre main theatre

Those who love British comedy will probably be familiar with David Walliams, the writer of, and lead actor in the popular BBC television series, Little Britain. Less commonly known, is the array of children’s books that Walliams has written, including a book called Mr Stink (2009). Maryam Master, Australian writer of children’s productions, who has also written 80 episodes for Home and Away, adapted the book into a play that premiered at the Sydney Opera House in April last year. A team of this calibre, including award-winning Australian director, Jonathan Biggins, indicates that there is more to Mr Stink than pure children’s entertainment.

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David Walliams Promotes His Book “Mr Stink” At Bluewater Shopping Centre In Kent. (Photo by Mark Cuthbert/UK Press via Getty Images)

 

Like any good comedic art, Mr Stink engages people of all ages in fun and laughter, but also raises and addresses moral challenges that our society faces today.

Twelve-year old Chloe (played by Romy Watson) faces bullying and cyberbullying by her school peers and is downtrodden by her overbearing, career-driven mother Mrs Crumb (Anna Cheney), who fails to listen to or recognise her daughter’s talents. Chloe is a wonderful story-writer with a vivid imagination and has a talent for listening and engaging compassionately with others. Instead of praising Chloe, Mrs Crumb favours her other daughter Annabelle (Amanda Laing) for going along with her wishes in engaging in an exhausting regimen of extra-curricular activities such as ballet, panpipe lessons, basketball and yoga. Even Chloe’s father (Darren Sabadina) is too scared of Mrs Crumb to admit that he has lost his job, resorting to locking himself in the cupboard under the stairs, but “only during business hours”.

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Things start to change for Chloe when she meets Mr Stink (John O’Hare), a homeless man living in a nearby park. Although Mr Stink is very stinky and behaves oddly and amusingly at times, he has an innate gift of being real, honest and a good listener. Mr Stink tears down all pretences and in doing so, creates the avenues needed for Chloe’s family to talk to one another and remember the things that are truly important.

This delightful play is hilariously brought to life by skilful actors. Anna Cheney fabulously portrays Chloe’s highly-driven mother falling apart at the seams. Darren Sabadina cleverly switches between three very different but engaging characters: Raj the shopkeeper, Mr Crumb and the Prime Minister. John O’Hare, Amanda Laing and Romy Watson create convincing characters that the audience can relate to. Skilful acting aside, Mr Stink is also thought-provoking. The play encourages the audience to consider a range of issues that contemporary children and young people are grappling with, and provides insight on how to help young people deal with those issues. Mr Stink may be at the bottom of society’s hierarchy, but his kindness, humility and ability to stand up for the justice of others, heals a family and a community.

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See FAC website for details on exciting upcoming shows for families, including Seussical, We’re Going On a Bearhunt, Diary of a Wombat, Saltbush and Horrible Harriet.

Copyright © 2017 Jade Barker

White mural delights Hastings residents

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In the Mornington Peninsula seaside town of Hastings, artist Simon White has charmed community residents with his beautiful new mural depicting scenes from the town’s history. The mural is the latest in a series of public art pieces created in this location since April 2014 as part of the ‘Adopt-A-Hotspot’ project, aiming to “prevent and reduce the incidents of graffiti and property damage in the Hastings community”.

This ‘Hotspot’, turned public art space, is a walkway between the Woolworths carpark and Main Street, beautifying the external wall of Terry White Chemist.

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The mural is made up of seven maritime scenes, separated by angular lines. Each one focuses on people, places, animals and boats that are key icons of Hastings’ heritage.

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These include the Mirabella family who arrived in Hastings in 1880; the Lothian family from c. 1890; Hastings Fish Shed built in 1866 and restored by John Wooley in 1988, accompanied by resident pelicans; a family in a fishing boat with dolphins swimming beneath the water; Jack Sheehan and his fishing boats; young people in swimming attire at Hastings foreshore c. 1907; and a scene of a fishing family building a wooden boat with one man proudly holding up the catch of the day.

This wonderful project was initiated by Councillor David Garnock in 2014 and continues to be supported by the Mornington Peninsula Shire Council (MPSC), Westernport Chamber of Commerce, Sheldon Headspeath, Brett Cardwell and Hastings Police.

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This project not only prevents property damage but enriches the cultural landscape of the area, contributes to wellbeing and gives all members of the community free access to the joy of art. As I was taking photos of the mural, several residents stopped to tell me how much pleasure the mural gives them as they walk through their town. Supporting the ‘Hotspot’ project indefinitely, as part of the Shire’s Cultural Strategy, will not only delight the community, but build a legacy of public art and historical acknowledgement in Hastings both present and future.

Copyright © 2017 Jade Barker

Visit Frankston Arts Centre!

Frankston Arts Centre (FAC) is your local venue to see and participate in performing and visual arts. With 812 performances in the past year, the calendar is packed full of exciting events to suit everyone.

FAC operates from two buildings on Davey Street Frankston: The big green building above Frankston Library and Cube 37 right next door.

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The Main Theatre seats 800 people and attracts big-name performing arts companies including Bell Shakespeare, Australian Ballet, Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, Melbourne International Comedy Festival and Circus Oz who perform at FAC on their regional tours each year. The brand new bar offers a great selection of pre-show and interval refreshments, as well as providing a priority line for members. It is also the perfect venue for schools to hire for annual performances.

The 194-seat, flexible performance space in Cube 37 sets the stage for intimate music, dance, circus and community performances. Cube 37 is your art space, offering a discounted hire rate for community groups. It is the place to indulge your artistic creativity, whatever your ability, and is home to an impressive range of art, theatre and circus workshops, including programs tailored to school students and children. This is your invitation to get involved!

FAC has visual art exhibition spaces in the foyer areas of both Cube 37 and the Main Theatre. With 73 exhibitions being shown in the past year, there is always something new and exciting on, and entry is free.

The function centre is well set-up for corporate events and private functions, catering for up to 500 people. It is also close to public transport and has an underground car park with 270 spaces.

FAC was designed by renowned Australian architect, Daryl Jackson, and was opened in 1995 by then Prime Minister, Hon. Paul Keating.

Visit the website for more information: thefac.com.au

FAC Facts

  • 152,000 visitors annually
  • 812 performances, 541 events, 73 exhibitions, 20 workshops each year
  • Audience: 36% Frankston residents, 64% Mornington Peninsula, Bayside, Ringwood and Gippsland
  • Part of Frankston City Council and operates under the Frankston Art Strategy 2011-2015
  • 39831 Check-ins on Facebook with 6474 ‘Likes

Copyright © 2016 Jade Barker